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Weekly Joke
18 May 2006

Every morning when the English teacher came to the Afrikaans students to give them an English lecture she greeted them as follows; "Good morning class!" and every time only one boy would get up out of the whole class to greet the teacher in return.
This happened time and again until she decided to call him up to her desk and ask him loud enough for everyone to hear:
"Why is it that every time I greet the whole class, only you stand up to greet me?"
He replied to the teacher in English:
"It are 'cause I are the only person here what's name are Klaas!"

 

Big bonus this week - Michael Naicker (our favourite from Durbs by the sea) wants to join the AWB! Get it here. Then there's the Jew story as well. Note that these sound clips might offend sensitive ears!

While on the subject - all multimedia jokes (movieclips and sound files) are located under the multimedia jokes header from the jokes page.

 

While on holiday in Kenya and walking through the bush a man comes across an elephant standing with one leg raised in the air. The elephant seems distressed so the man approaches very carefully. He gets down on one knee and inspects the bottom of the elephant's foot only to find a large thorn deeply imbedded. As carefully and as gently as he can he removes the thorn and the elephant gingerly puts its foot down. The elephant turns to face the man and with a rather stern look on its face, stares at him.

For a good ten minutes the man stands frozen - thinking of nothing else but being trampled. Eventually the elephant turns and walks away. For years after the man often remembers and ponders the events of that day ... One day the man is walking through the zoo with his son. As they approach the elephant enclosure, one of the elephants turns and walks over to where they are standing at the rail. It stares at him and the man can't help wondering if this is the same elephant. The man climbs tentatively over the railing and makes his way into the enclosure.

He walks right up to the elephant and stares back in wonder. Suddenly the elephant wraps its trunk around one of the man's legs and swings him wildly back and forth along the railing, instantly killing him.

Probably not the same elephant then.





South Africa

Africa is a continent of valuable resources, from large reserves of oil, to minerals such as diamonds and gold; it is also home to an incredible variety of wild animals, plants, and trees. Yet Africa is also a continent with many problems. African countries are among the world's poorest--in fact, 32 of the world's poorest 44 countries are African. The series AFRICA: CONTINENT IN THE BALANCE examines the historical and current situation of selected African countries, providing background information and analysis for students on each country's geography and ecology; history; system of government; economy; people and cultures; and important cities and communities.

 

Thanks Pete, Sammy & Andrea




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